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Kenmore Range, Stove, Oven Repair

Appliance:
Kenmore Gas Range

Problem:
Gas range top burners will not light; when gas for the front burners is turned on the burners do not light, but when a match is lit near the burner to see if it is getting gas through the line, the burners light right up.

Solution:
If your burner is not lighting, that particular burner needs to be checked for this Kenmore range repair. Along the side of the burner, there are some very small holes that the pilot gas comes out of and hits the spark area. If those are plugged you're not going to get very good ignition.

The holes need to be cleaned out, but make sure to use something very, very small to do so. Sometimes even a pin, or a sewing needle, is too large. You want to make sure not to enlarge those holes because then you will have other problems, so you definitely want to use something that's really small.

If those holes are clean and you hear the gas sparking everywhere except the burner you want, it's possible that the spark module has failed. It could also be that the spark electrode, the little ceramic item that's normally mounted underneath the burner, is dirty, cracked, or misaligned so that the spark is not jumping to the metal burner assembly and allowing the gas to light.



Appliance:
1993 Kenmore Electric Range, Model number 790.9462990

Problem:
Main (large) oven heats higher than the set temperature - burning everything

Solution:
The first thing to check is that both the bake and broils elements are working. Set the oven to bake and see if the broil element (top) and bake element (bottom) are heating. This model has a thermostat (part # 5303934039) instead of a control board so that's what controls the oven temperature. Put in an oven thermometer (part # 19950054) to test the actual temperature. If the unit is normally 20, 30, 40 degrees off, at times, you can remove the oven thermostat knob (part # 3201567) and calibrate the temp on the knob.

In some units you can remove the back side of the unit and adjust the dial against the knob and kind of cheat it into getting the oven temperature to work. Other units will have a small screw in the stem of the thermostat (part # 5303934039) that's a calibration screw.  If it's far out of the correct temperature variation you can try calibrating it but most often it doesn't take or if it does it's not for very long. Set it to 350, and watch the unit cycle. Normally, it will cycle a little erratic the first two or three times so they normally recommend you throw the first two or three times out as far as the temperature swing goes. When you set to 350, what you're looking for it to do roughly is cycle up to a high point of around 375. It will cycle off, go back down to around 325 and then cycle back on. So what you're keeping is an average temperature of 350 degrees in your oven.

If it's off by 25 either way on average, that's still considered normal within the toleration of the components put in the unit. So, if you set it at 350 and it keeps 325, most manufacturers do not consider that an issue. If it's way beyond those tolerances you might want to look at replacing the thermostat control (part # 5303934039). One thing to make sure of is when you replace it, you want to make sure you feed that sensing bulb in the oven cavity properly and you do not break the small copper wire that attaches the sensing bulb to the thermostat because if you break that it's time for a new one again.



Appliance:
2003 Kenmore Gas Range, Model 790.71011200

Problem:
Not heating

Solution:
Most often the problem is the igniter (part #5303935066), even though it is glowing bright red or bright orange. It has to do with how much current that igniter is drawing, and after a period of time it becomes weak and it doesn't draw enough current to actuate the oven safety valve (part #3203459) properly. This is a fairly common thing, where people say the oven's not working, and it can't be the igniter because I see it glowing bright orange. The only way to really tell if it's the igniter is to use an amp probe, you hook that around one of the wires going to the igniter, and it will tell you how much current in that circuit is being drawn, and then you match that up to your gas valve as far as what the parameters are on that. If you don't have an amp probe, most often if you just replace the igniter, it will work for you.